Approaching the ice belt

Published 16.08 in category Northern Passage - 2010

Position update 04.10 CEST: 77.32885 N, 106.7193 E

Position update 13.48: 77.0116 N, 107.47663 E

Position update 19.26: 76.82639 N, 108.43146 E
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Expedition report, 13.56:
“After we passed Cape Chelyuskin yesterday morning, we continued east on the Laptev Sea. However, after a short while we were forced to conclude that the ice has formed a dense wall, a huge ice belt extending from north to south.

In consequence we have had to follow the shoreline, charting a more southerly course, following a large bay and finding our way forward. We have run slalom, sailing slowly through the drifting ice.

Being compelled to stay ever watchful may be a bit tiring, but it has given us some great nature experiences. Walrus and bearded seals lie lazily on the ice floes, watching us curiously as we sail past. There are no people in this area. All the sounds we hear are nature’s own: icebergs splitting away from glaciers or larger chunks of ice, walrus diving, the breath of whales and walruses as they surface. The scenery is stunning; we are cruising alongside a coastal wilderness.

We observe that the ice is drifting slowly northward, and Nick confirms this. In a day or two, this may well open an opportunity for us to once again chart a more easterly course across the Laptev Sea. That remains to be seen, of course, and we are eager to see what tomorrow brings.”

Best regards,
Thorleif

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Ice from the mast
View from the mast – charting the course may now require surgical precision.
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Note – two worthwhile links for today:
Weather forecast from Marc de Keyser
Animation of ice movement from Neven



11 comments to Approaching the ice belt11

  • Reply

    marc de keyser  /  August 16, 2010

    Good morning,
    some remarkable windshifts during the next few days: http://is.gd/ejMgN
    godspeed


  • Reply

    Irena  /  August 16, 2010

    Stas, this photo looks like your piece of work!


  • Reply

    Neven  /  August 16, 2010

    It looks like that band of ice is starting to move. There’s an animation of it on my blog.


  • Reply

    Irena  /  August 16, 2010

    Looks impressive this animation you did! And the timing of Borge, Stas and Thorlieff is just perfect!


  • Reply

    Gustave  /  August 16, 2010

    We have a saying in Norwegian: “lykken staar den kjekke bi”. I have a clear feeling that this is the case for our 3 friends!


  • Reply

    Neven  /  August 16, 2010

    Yes Irena, let’s hope the rest of the ice is blown away today as well. It all reminds me a bit of Moses parting the Red Sea. 😉

    Olav, the second position link is broken (remove 1 ‘h’ at the start of the link address).

    They’re almost there! Keep us up-to-date asap, please.


  • Reply

    Olav Grinde  /  August 16, 2010

    Ah, the dangers of copy/paste. Fixed. Thanks! I’m working on today’s Expedition Report now.


  • Reply

    Espen  /  August 16, 2010

    As Neven pointed out, there seems to a narrow ice free area around cape Arctichesky, according to the the latest satellite images, so if and when you get tru there it is more or less ice free for the of the trip, good luck boys. Espen


  • Reply

    Olav Grinde  /  August 16, 2010

    Cape Arkticheskiy? No, that’s much further north and quite a bit to the east, on the Komsomolets Islands. However, the “Northern Passage” has already made passage through the Vilkitsky Strait and passed Cape Chelyuskin…


  • Reply

    Espen  /  August 16, 2010

    My mistake, I meant beyond Preobrazheniya Island and Saint Peter Islands. Sorry Espen


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